CHEM

i need to be able to write the formula for each compund based on the name and ionic nomenclature as well so for instance CuSO4 and Iron(ll) oxide

Answers
Do you need some help with this jarnol13?
Layla G.
14 September 2017
This is a YouTube video I produced and it may help you in this regard:https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=QqT2uZZL8RY
franklychemistry
01 October 2017
CuSo4 copper sulphateIron(2) oxide.  Ferrous sulphate
sowjanya
24 April 2018
You need to remember the name of ions first from the common list available in many books.First the name of positively charged ion (cation) is written with its charge in roman followed by name of the anion. Remember that valencies are cross multiplied while writing formulae.For example CuSO4 Copper(II) sulphateIron(II) oxide FeO
jyotsna.khurana1
08 August 2018
CuSO4    = Copper(II) sulphateIron(II) oxide  =  FeO
chemtutor1
28 February 2019
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Similar questions

Catalyst equation help

A catalyst consisting of palladium on an α-Al2O3 support, Pd/α-Al2O3, has been used for the oxidation of CO at room temperature:

Equation 1 CO(g) + ½O2(g) = CO2(g)

Under certain conditions, the oxidation reaction was found to involve competitive adsorption of the reactants with CO being non-dissociatively adsorbed and oxygen undergoing dual-site adsorption:

Equation 2 ka CO(g) + * ↔ CO(ad) Kd

Equation 3 ka’ O2(g) + 2* ↔ O(ad) + O(ad) kd’

The rate-limiting step is then a bimolecular reaction between CO(ad) and O(ad):

Equation 4 CO(ad) + O(ad) → CO (ad)

Carbon dioxide can be assume to be weakly adsorbed and, as a consequence, desorbs as quickly as it is formed.

(i) For the competitive adsorption of CO show that the following expression can be derived by equating the rates of adsorption and desorption of CO:

Equation 5 θCO = bCOpCO(1 – θCO – θO)

Where θCO and θO are the fractional surface coverages of CO and O, respectively. The quantity bCO (= ka/kd) is the adsorption coefficient for CO and pCO is the partial pressure of CO. (Hint In your working you should represent the total number of adsorption sites by N and provide expressions for both the rate of adsorption and the rate of desorption of CO.)

(ii) Equation 5 can be used in a more detailed analysis of the mechanism to derive the following two expressions:

Equation 6 θCO = (bCOpCO) / (1 + bCOpCO + (bO2pO2)1/2)

and

Equation 7 θO = θCO((bO2pO2)1/2 / bCOpCO)

where b02(= ka’ / kd’) and pO2 are, respectively, the adsorption coefficient and partial pressure of O2.

Given Equations 6 and 7, in conjunction with the information about the rate-limiting step at the start of this question, show that the theoretical rate equation takes the form:

Equation 8 r = (kθbCOpCO(bO2pO2)1/2) / {1 + bCOpCO + (bO2pO2)1/2}^2

(iii) The experimental rate equation for the CO oxidation reaction, under conditions for which the mechanism given in part (ii) is valid, takes the form:

Equation 9 r = (kR(pO2)1/2) / pCO

How can this result be rationalised in terms of the theoretical rate equation (Equation 8) that has been derived for the mechanism?

Catalyst equation help (redone)

A catalyst consisting of palladium on an α-Al2O3 support, Pd/α-Al2O3, has been used for the oxidation of CO at room temperature:

Equation 1 CO(g) + ½O2(g) = CO2(g)

Under certain conditions, the oxidation reaction was found to involve competitive adsorption of the reactants with CO being non-dissociatively adsorbed and oxygen undergoing dual-site adsorption:

Equation 2 ka CO(g) + * ↔ CO(ad) kd

Equation 3 ka’ O2(g) + 2* ↔ O(ad) + O(ad) kd’

The rate-limiting step is then a bimolecular reaction between CO(ad) and O(ad):

Equation 4 CO(ad) + O(ad) → CO (ad)

Carbon dioxide can be assume to be weakly adsorbed and, as a consequence, desorbs as quickly as it is formed.

(i) For the competitive adsorption of CO show that the following expression can be derived by equating the rates of adsorption and desorption of CO:

Equation 5 θCO = bCOpCO(1 – θCO – θO)

Where θCO and θO are the fractional surface coverages of CO and O, respectively. The quantity bCO (= ka/kd) is the adsorption coefficient for CO and pCO is the partial pressure of CO. (Hint In your working you should represent the total number of adsorption sites by N and provide expressions for both the rate of adsorption and the rate of desorption of CO.)

(ii) Equation 5 can be used in a more detailed analysis of the mechanism to derive the following two expressions:

Equation 6 θCO = (bCOpCO) / (1 + bCOpCO + (bO2pO2)1/2)

and

Equation 7 θO = θCO((bO2pO2)1/2 / bCOpCO)

where b02(= ka’ / kd’) and pO2 are, respectively, the adsorption coefficient and partial pressure of O2.

Given Equations 6 and 7, in conjunction with the information about the rate-limiting step at the start of this question, show that the theoretical rate equation takes the form:

Equation 8 r = (kθbCOpCO(bO2pO2)1/2) / {1 + bCOpCO + (bO2pO2)1/2}^2

(iii) The experimental rate equation for the CO oxidation reaction, under conditions for which the mechanism given in part (ii) is valid, takes the form:

Equation 9 r = (kR(pO2)1/2) / pCO

How can this result be rationalised in terms of the theoretical rate equation (Equation 8) that has been derived for the mechanism?