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How does this suggest the charge of the hypochlorite ion in the compound is calcium hypochlorite?

The calcium ion has a charge of 2+ (Ca2+)

Answers
hypochlorite has a charge of 1-. Calcium ions have a charge of 2+, when they form a molecule, you get CaClO2, where the subscript of CLO indicates the charge of the cation in this case calcium.
saranyaammu
17 May 2019
Hypochlorite has a formula of Ca(ClO)2, ClO has an overall charge of +1, given there are two molecules the overall charge is +2. Calcium ion also has a charge of +2 on its own. Therefore the Calcium ion charge is equal to the hypochlorite ion molecule charge. 
carolina_soars
29 May 2019
Calcium hypochlorite formula is Ca(ClO)2, Calcium is having +2 charge. Therefore two hypochlorite is having -2 charge. Here two hypochloite ions sharing -2 charge. Each hypochlorite ion is having -1 charge.
rao12
11 June 2019
Calcium hypochlorite which has a chemical formula Ca(ClO)2, so the overall charge of the compound is 0 and Ca2+ has a charge of +2. In order to have an overall charge of 0, (ClO)2 has to be -2 to balance the charge of Ca2+. Therefore, ClO has a charge of -1 as there are two ClO ions.
funghk
23 June 2019
Calcium hypochlorite is Ca(ClO)2. If Ca has charge 2+ this means the hypochlorite ion has charge -1, so that two such ions combine with the Ca2+.In the hypochlorite ion a covalent bond between Cl and O fills the Cl valence shell, and leaves one electron lacking in O's valence shell. So an extra electron stabilises the pair to form the ion with single negative charge.
Amritha J.
19 July 2019
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Similar questions

How do you know whether to use 'ide' or 'ate', when naming a compound?


How are Chemical Compounds Named?

Chemical nomenclature is the process of naming compounds. Naming compounds is important to allow scientists to identify and recognize the different compounds. When naming molecular compounds prefixes are used to dictate the number of a given element present in the compound. For example:

  • “mono-” indicates one,
  • “di-” indicates two,
  • “tri-” is three,
  • “tetra-” is four,
  • “penta-” is five,
  •  “hexa-” is six,
  • “hepta-” is seven,
  • “octo-” is eight,
  • “nona-” is nine,
  • and “deca” is ten.

For a more in depth explanation check out this video.

How do you know whether to use 'ide' or 'ate', when naming a compound?

-ide is used for non-metal compounds generally. For example, Chlorine forms a chloride ion, so NaCl is Sodium Chloride. -ate and -ite are commonly used for polyatomic ions of Oxygen. -ate is used for the ion that has the largest number of Oxygen atoms. The -ite would be used for the ion with the smaller. NO2 and NO3 are known as Nitrite and Nitrate respectively. Nitrite has a smaller number of oxygen atoms so when added to an element it will be _ Nitrite. On the other than, Nitrate has a larger number of Oxygen atoms so when added to an element it is _ Nitrate Share your tips and advice for learning the names of chemical compounds in the comments.  

How do you name compounds in chemistry?

The elements that are joined together through chemical bonds are known as chemical compounds. The chemical bonds between the compounds are strong enough to make them act like a single substance. Do you know how many compounds are there? The answer is that there are more than 350,000 chemical compounds that are registered for use and production. You can easily search the list of compounds online. The properties of compounds are different than those of the elements that were used to make those compounds. Now, the question arises how these compounds are named in chemistry? The answer is simple. There is a standard method of naming chemical compounds that is employed by all the scientists  worldwide.

Rules for Naming Ionic or Molecular Compounds

Here are the simple steps to name compounds in chemistry: Step 1: Determine whether the compound in an ionic or molecular compound The first step is to identify whether the compound you are going to name is an ionic compound or a molecular compound. To do so, you should know what ionic and molecular compounds are.

  • The compound is ionic if it contains a metal. Metals are present on the middle and left side of the periodic table.
  • The compound is molecular if it contains two nonmetals. Nonmetals are present on the right side of the periodic table above the staircase, including hydrogen)

  Step 2: To the end of the second compound's name, add the word "ide"   After you have determined a molecular or ionic compound, the next step if to look at the second compound and replace the last three words with "ide". This rule is same for molecular or ionic compounds. For instance, if the second compound is chlorine, then you should remove "ine" and replace it with "ide", so that we can spell it "chloride".   Step 3: Check if you require roman numerals   Look for an ionic compound that has a transition metal that becomes a multivalent ion. If you have ionic compounds with transition metals, then you should add a roman numeral after the metal name to show the transition metal's charge. For instance, FeCl is named as iron (I) chloride and FeCl_2 is named as iron (II) chloride.   Step 4: Check if any prefixes are required Because there are no ionic charges to balance out molecular compounds, therefore you should use prefixes shown in the table below:

mono1
di2
tri3
tera4
penta5
hexa6
hepta7
octa8
nona9
deca10
For instance, CO_2 is named as carbon dioxide and CO is named as carbon mono oxide.  

Naming Ionic Compounds that Contain Polyatomic Ions

The rules for naming ionic compounds containing polyatomic ions are different. Polyatomic ions contain more than one atom. For instance, SO^{-}_{4} has one nitrogen atom and four oxygen atoms. In a polyatomic ion, the atoms are generally covalently bonded to each other. They act as a single charged unit. Most of the compounds containing polyatomic ions end with "ate" or "ite". Only some of them end with "ide". For instance, Na_2SO_4 is named as sodium sulphate and Na_2SO_4 is called sodium sulphite.  

Naming Acids

The prefix  "hydro" and the suffix name"ic" are used to name hydro acids. For instance, HF is called hydrofluoric acid and HCl is named as hydrochloric acid. Oxoacids are acids that contain oxygen. We use the suffix "ic" or "ous" while naming them. The suffix "ic" is used when the acid has more oxygen atoms. For instance, H_2SO_4 is named sulphuric acid.  

What are the three types of compounds?

We all know that a chemical element has one type of atom only. When a substance contains more than one kind of atom, then we say that it is a compound. In other words, we can say that a compound refers to a substance in which two or more atoms are bonded with each other.

Millions of compounds exist and all fall in the following three broad categories:

1) Ionic Compounds These compounds are made up of ions. Ions are charged particles that are made when an atom gains or loses  electrons. There are two types of ions: cation and anion. A cation is a positively charged ion and the anion is a negatively charged ion. These compounds are generally formed by a reaction between a metal and a nonmetal. To determine how to name these compounds, see the rules for naming ionic compounds in the previous section. 2) Molecular or Covalent Compounds They are formed when elements of the compound share electrons in a covalent bond to make up a molecule. These compounds are formed by the reaction between two nonmetals. 3) Acids Acids are compounds that contain hydrogen. It is easy to recognize acids as they contain hydrogen and anion. For instance, HNO_3 is named as nitric acid and H_2SO_4 is named as sulphuric acid.  

How do you identify types of compounds?

You can identify the type of compound by simply looking at the nature of its composition. Ionic Compounds: These compounds are formed when metal and non-metal are joined together. If you see that a compound is made from a metal and nonmetal, then you can easily categorize it as an ionic compound. For instance, NaCl is an ionic compound because sodium is a metal and chlorine is a nonmetal.   Covalent compounds: These compounds are formed when two nonmetals are held together by a covalent bond. When you see a compound with two or more nonmetals, then you can easily term it as a covalent compound.  For instance, carbon monoxide is made from two nonmetals carbon and oxygen, hence it is a covalent compound   Acids: Acids contain hydrogen and anion.  

What are the general rules for nomenclature? What are nomenclature rules?

Scientists employ nomenclature to name compounds clearly in chemistry. Ionic and molecular compounds are named using distinct methods. Nomenclature in chemistry refers to a set of rules to generate systematic names of  compounds. The nomenclature which is used by the chemists and scientists worldwide is created and developed by the IUPAC (International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry).

Rules for Nomenclature

A) Binary ionic compounds are made up of metal and non-metal. While naming the compound, the name of the metal is written first, followed by the name of the non-metal. The last three alphabets of the non-metal are replaced with "ide". B) If the compound contains polyatomic ion, then the last three alphabets of a non-metal are replaced with "ate" or "ite". "ate" is employed when there are more oxygen atoms present in a compound and "ite" is used when number of oxygen atoms present in a compound is less. Some compounds also contain "ide" for instance OH (hydroxide). C) To name binary compounds between two nonmetals, prefixes such as 1 = mono, 2 - di, 3 = tri, and so on are used. For instance, CO_2 is named as carbon dioxide and CO is named as carbon monoxide.  

Why is nomenclature important? What is the purpose of nomenclature?

There are two objectives of using nomenclature in chemistry:

  • To make sure that a spoken or written chemical name does not contain any ambiguity regarding the chemical compound the name is referring towards. It is important that each chemical name points towards a single substance.
  • To ascertain that each substance has one name only (although alternative names are acceptable in some cases)
  • To help the chemists communicate with their peers easily.