newtons law

what's live example of newton's 3rd law?

Answers
Stepping off a boat is a very common example, as you go to step off the boat, both you move forward and the boat will move backwards.Thus the force you apply to move yourself forwards off the boat is applied equally and oppositely to the boat. Hence you move and the boat moves.
vandanparmar
01 September 2014
For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. One real world example of which would be if a weight is sitting at rest on a table. Its weight would be the action and the force exerted by the table would be the reaction. If the weight pushed DOWN on the table with 100N of force, the table would be pushing UP on the weight, also with 100N of force. I.e. the force is equal but opposite. Other good examples are rocket launches, recoil from firing a gun etc. Hope this helps.
web_tutor
01 September 2014
If you crash your car into another car, your car exerts a force onto the other car, which by Newton's 3rd law will exert a force equal in magnitude and opposite in direction onto your car. Both cars end up in a pretty bad way.However, if you crash your car into a solid brick wall then the result is different: only the car is damaged whilst the wall is fine. How come? Did the wall exert less force on the car? Well, Newton wasn't wrong - both the car and the wall exert the same amount of force on each other, but the wall is more rigid and has more inertia than the car. This illustrates why we must take all of Newton's laws into account in every situation we wish to describe using mechanics, as often seemingly intuitive answers are wrong!For another example, think about the moon and the Earth - does one exert more force on the other? If not, how can the moon orbit us whilst we hardly move? (There is a great exploration of this on Veritasium's YouTube channel "Best Film on Newton's Third Law. Ever." - check it out!)
Max P.
19 September 2015
Newton's third law is: For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. The statement means that in every interaction, there is a pair of forces acting on the two interacting objects. The size of the forces on the first object equals the size of the force on the second object.Real life examples: - A fish pushes water backward by using its fins. What happens then is the water pushes the fish forward with same force as the fish had exerted on the water. Hence, action-reaction force pairs enable the fish to swim. The same technique is applied by human swimmers. - A bird flies by use of its wings. The wings of a bird push air downwards. Since forces result from mutual interactions, the air must also be pushing the bird upwards. The size of the force on the air equals the size of the force on the bird; the direction of the force on the air (downwards) is opposite the direction of the force on the bird (upwards). For every action, there is an equal (in size) and opposite (in direction) reaction. Action-reaction force pairs make it possible for birds to fly. A car is equipped with wheels that spin. As the wheels spin, they grip the road and push the road backwards. Since forces result from mutual interactions, the road must also be pushing the wheels forward. The size of the force on the road equals the size of the force on the wheels (or car); the direction of the force on the road (backwards) is opposite the direction of the force on the wheels (forwards). For every action, there is an equal (in size) and opposite (in direction) reaction. Action-reaction force pairs make it possible for cars to move along a roadway surface.
Wafaa K.
14 January 2017
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