If you’re an accounting tutor and you’re looking for alternate sources of income to keep you afloat when you’re not teaching, creating a course isn’t a bad idea at all.

While it might seem like it would require a monumental effort on your part, the reality is in can be done in a series of small steps.

In this guide, we’re going to explore what some of those steps should be, and give you some tips on how you can organise your accounting course.

It should soon become clear where you should be focusing your time and energy, so after reading this guide you should be in a position to channel your efforts into the course in a meaningful way.

Like with anything, once you take that first step, every step you take after that will be much easier. You'll be well on your way to enjoy the advantages of being an accounting tutor.

So with that in mind, what are you waiting for?

organisation
You need to spend time planning out your course if you want it to be a success. Unsplash
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Decide on a Topic

Before anything else, if you want to create an accounting course that sells, you’re going to need to settle on a topic that will resonate with your intended audience.

If you’re an accounting tutor and you work exclusively with businessmen for example, the topic could be something along the lines of ‘accounting tips for the entrepreneur’. If you teach secondary school kids, the course topic could be more practical, and the title might include the name of a specific exam that you can prepare students for.

As you can see with the blogs and YouTube channels of successful content creators, the name isn’t everything.

Many people create names when they’re just starting out with a seed of an idea, perhaps never expecting it to grow into something big. As such, names are often an afterthought, and seen as an obstacle to getting started.

Your course name can represent a similar obstacle to getting started, but we do recommend that you settle on one which sums up the content of the course and appeals to the intended audience.

This might seem like a hard task, but once you’ve ironed out the details of what you’re going to include in the course, naming it should be a lot easier.

In order to pick the perfect course topic, what you need to do is think about what you bring to the table that other accounting tutors don’t.

  • Is it your charisma and enthusiasm for the subject matter?
  • Is it your unique methods and teaching ideas?
  • Is it the way you present the information?

You need to find out your USP if you don’t already know it, as this is what is going to help you sell your course.

Plan Out Your Course Modules

post-it plan
While your plan might not involve post-its, it's an important part of any course creation process. Unsplash

Once you’ve settled on a topic and a title for your course, you’ll want to drill down into the details and plan out your individual course modules or sections.

Every online course should have a clear structure that guides the student through the material.

If you just present all of the information you know about accounting to the student in a jumbled mess, the chance that they will retain anything is slim.

You need to deliberately think about how you want your students to take the information onboard, choosing a structure that makes the most sense for their understanding.

There are various ways to do this, but typically you’ll want to make sure that the course content is moving in the same direction.

For example, you could take a broad overview of the field of accounting in the beginning, and then as you progress through the course address individual topics within the subject, and focus in on specific pieces of information. This structure can be thought of as starting with a wide lens, and then zooming in over time.

Another approach you could take is to break down the content into various themes or categories, and address them in a logical order. Perhaps there’s one concept that once you understand it, will help you to understand two or three other concepts.

There’s another factor to bear in mind here too, which may or may not apply to you: will this be a one-off course or part of a series of courses you plan to release?

If it’s part of a series, then you’ll want to brainstorm how all the courses will connect together before you go ahead and plan out your first course. Otherwise, you could end up in an awkward situation where you’re covering the same ground across various courses.

If you are going to create multiple courses, it might be a good idea to make each course on just a single concept that you cover in great depth. It may be better to have a single course that can be the go-to on accounting for students, rather than a course that provides watered-down descriptions of microeconomics, banking and investment, and auditing.

Create Realistic Learning Outcomes

Taking the structure you’ve established with your modules, it’s a good idea to come up with some realistic learning outcomes for the course.

At school, you most likely had some form of learning objective or learning outcome to write out before starting some classes. The idea behind this is that it gives students a clear idea of what they can expect to learn.

In the world of online courses, a learning outcome is also a promise to students as to what you will deliver. Since it’s a business transaction, your students are also customers in this context, so you need to convince them why they should invest in your product over that of your competitor.

So how do you come up with good learning outcomes for your course?

To create a realistic learning outcome, you must clearly outline what the student will learn if they take your course. You need to answer the following questions:

  • What concepts will the student tackle?
  • What new skills will they pick up?

Often, the learning outcome is written in the following manner:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate…

By the end of this course, you will have an understanding of...

Taking this course, students will develop key skills in accounting such as...

Of course, you need to be as specific as possible with your learning outcomes and you need to make sure that you are in fact delivering what you say you will with your course content.

Figure out Logistics

document stacks
Providing resources throughout your course can help provide extra value to your students. Unsplash

There are other details to hash out when creating your first accounting course, which include resources, pricing, and platform.

All three of these factors are important to think about, even though they may not concern the content of your course.

Resources

You’ll have noticed if you’ve taken online courses before that they will often include resources in addition to the content of the individual classes.

These supplementary resources are designed to aid the student’s understanding of a concept or topic, or provide more information that you don’t have enough time to go into in your course.

They can be external, such as links to academic journal pages or YouTube videos, or they can be internal such as resources you’ve made yourself to go with the course that can include anything from PDF worksheets to videos you’ve recorded.

Internal resources are better, as the information is coming from you, and you can show the student that you’ve gone the extra mile to provide them with everything they need to know to master the topic at hand.

Pricing

Pricing isn’t something we’re going to be able to help you figure out in a paragraph or two, but there are a few tips we can provide to help.

To settle on the right pricing for your course, you need to consider the competition and what others charge for similar accounting courses, whether it’s a one-off course or part of a membership scheme, and how much income you want to generate.

At the end of the day, it’s entirely up to you to decide on the right pricing plan for your course, based on factors such as skill, qualifications, experience, and more.

You’ll also have to consider if you want to offer a discount for the first few days of the course launch, and how you’re going to promote it.

Platform

Choosing a platform is equally as important as figuring out what you’re going to charge, as it can affect how many people organically come across your course during online searches.

One of the most popular platforms for online courses is Udemy, though there are dozens of other options out there which are just as good.

As such, you should do due diligence and make sure you research all of the options before you decide where to put your online course.

While you might not be able to upload your course, Superprof provides accounting tutors with a platform to teach from and easily find more students. If you’re struggling to generate interest in your classes or land more students, Superprof can help you settle into a rhythm.

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Samuel

Sam is an English teaching assistant and freelance writer based in southern Spain. He enjoys exploring new places and cultures, and picking up languages along the way.