Here we are, with summer just starting and the weather practically begging us to go outside. Doesn't getting out and getting moving again sound like a plan? This summer, how about going beyond walks or runs in the park, cycling and swimming? Why not try yourself on the tennis court?

Many physical activities offer health benefits like improved flexibility, strength and muscle tone but no sport comes quite as loaded with health benefits as tennis:

  • it can help lower your blood pressure and resting heart rate
  • it helps improve hand-eye coordination, and spatial awareness and increases reaction time
  • it helps improve metabolic function and lower body fat
  • it's one of the best sports to help increase bone density

Studies show that recent events have caused people to change their focus and rethink their lives. Everything from work to personal habits is under scrutiny, with physical fitness and social activity now of the highest concern. Even if you already know what are the physical benefits of playing tennis, there's a fair chance that you've not considered the sport's social aspects.

Are you also looking to boost your level of physical activity while engaging with like-minded people? Maybe it's time to consider tennis.

Let Superprof give you reasons why tennis should be your game.

The best Tennis tutors available
Samantha
5
5 (16 reviews)
Samantha
£45
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
James
5
5 (18 reviews)
James
£35
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Ali
5
5 (15 reviews)
Ali
£59
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Leo
5
5 (15 reviews)
Leo
£75
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Eugene
5
5 (13 reviews)
Eugene
£40
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Luca
5
5 (8 reviews)
Luca
£26
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Henry
5
5 (10 reviews)
Henry
£60
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Jonny
5
5 (4 reviews)
Jonny
£65
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Samantha
5
5 (16 reviews)
Samantha
£45
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
James
5
5 (18 reviews)
James
£35
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Ali
5
5 (15 reviews)
Ali
£59
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Leo
5
5 (15 reviews)
Leo
£75
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Eugene
5
5 (13 reviews)
Eugene
£40
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Luca
5
5 (8 reviews)
Luca
£26
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Henry
5
5 (10 reviews)
Henry
£60
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Jonny
5
5 (4 reviews)
Jonny
£65
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Let's go

The Benefits of Tennis

For many, the word 'tennis' conjures up bright green tennis balls that dogs like to chase and chew on. Their boundless joy at the mere sight of those fuzzy orbs makes me want to enjoy playing with tennis balls too.

Find fun tennis lessons for kids near me here on Superprof.

Dogs play tennis without rackets
Dogs have their own version of playing tennis. Photo by Tadeusz Lakota on Unsplash

Others tend to have more conventional ideas about tennis, anything from the tidy assurance of tennis whites to the distinctive 'thwack!' of a solid connection between ball and racket. From whiling away afternoons at the tennis club to attending majors at Wimbledon, few people assign tennis any negative characteristics.

That's because finding downsides to tennis is hard. Even the dreaded tennis elbow, a painful condition caused by overworking muscles on the back of your forearm is not caused solely by playing tennis. By contrast, finding upsides to playing tennis...

Let's just say we didn't have to work very hard.

For one, playing does wonders for your balance and flexibility. This is not the type of sport that lets you stand around and wait for the ball to come to you; you get to dodge and lunge and dive and reach to make that connection. Recall that the most dramatic photos of tennis players making that winning return see their bodies positioned at difficult angles and making impossible reaches, often while standing on one leg.

Another gift tennis delivers is improved hand-eye coordination and heightened spatial awareness. You have to be able to gauge where the ball is and how fast it's travelling and position your racket to meet it. You also have to maintain awareness of where your partner is if you're playing doubles and, at all times, where the boundary lines are.

Other cognitive skills that tennis boosts include tactical thinking and planning. As you play, your brain is constantly processing where you are and where you have to get to, your opponent's strategy and figuring out ways to beat it, and how you need to hit the ball so that those on the other side of the net have to scramble to return it.

And it does all of that while still coordinating your body's movements.

In light of all this, is it any wonder that tennis players leave the club wreathed in smiles and mentally alert? Doesn't make you wonder how you could get into tennis?

What Are the Physical Benefits of Playing Tennis?

"A tennis match is a thousand little sprints."
- Bjorn Borg

As tennis is a high-energy game; there is no doubt that one must be fit to play it. The trouble with that statement is being fit is such a general term that it hardly does justice to all of the health benefits you could derive from regular court time.

To wit, few fitness mags mention bone health in conjunction with fitness.

The average human hits peak bone health at around 30 years of age; that ceiling could be lower, depending on lifestyle and levels of overall physical activity. Coincidentally, around that age is when most of us start slowing down and doing less - two causes that can lead to bone loss.

Not every form of exercise can help you build up your bone mass. Weight lifting does wonders for your muscles but not terribly much for your bones. Other forms of exercise such as swimming and cycling are great for your heart and muscle tone but they don't give your skeleton the weight-bearing activity needed to maintain and build bone mass.

If you're concerned about the state your bones might be in, playing tennis is one way to ensure they will remain stronger, and longer. In fact, it's one of the sports recommended by the American National Institutes of Health for bone health.

Find quality tennis lessons near me here on Superprof.

Play tennis for higher bone mass and better heart health
Tennis is a very active game that can lead to greater bone mass and better heart health. Photo by Muktasim Azlan on Unsplash

What about heart health?

Tennis is a fast-paced game that demands a lot of movement; naturally, your heart will benefit from your playing. It's astounding, though, just how much your cardiovascular system will improve. Because of the heightened activity, your muscles will need a greater supply of nutrients and oxygen to function at that rate, so your body will develop a more extensive capillary system to deliver those products to your muscles.

Tennis is a complete body workout, keeping everything in motion all at once: your legs for running, your arms to swing the racket and balance, your mind to calculate all of the possibilities and your heart, pumping away, making sure you can play as long as you want.

Are you ready to find a tennis coach or do you need to know about the cost of tennis lessons before you take the plunge?

Find tennis lessons London here on Superprof.

The best Tennis tutors available
Samantha
5
5 (16 reviews)
Samantha
£45
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
James
5
5 (18 reviews)
James
£35
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Ali
5
5 (15 reviews)
Ali
£59
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Leo
5
5 (15 reviews)
Leo
£75
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Eugene
5
5 (13 reviews)
Eugene
£40
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Luca
5
5 (8 reviews)
Luca
£26
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Henry
5
5 (10 reviews)
Henry
£60
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Jonny
5
5 (4 reviews)
Jonny
£65
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Samantha
5
5 (16 reviews)
Samantha
£45
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
James
5
5 (18 reviews)
James
£35
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Ali
5
5 (15 reviews)
Ali
£59
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Leo
5
5 (15 reviews)
Leo
£75
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Eugene
5
5 (13 reviews)
Eugene
£40
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Luca
5
5 (8 reviews)
Luca
£26
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Henry
5
5 (10 reviews)
Henry
£60
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Jonny
5
5 (4 reviews)
Jonny
£65
/h
Gift icon
1st lesson free!
Let's go

The Mental Health Benefits for Tennis

John McEnroe aside, tennis players are a fairly even-tempered bunch. For all that, they have a wicked backhand and could probably run circles around most everyone so great is their endurance, you might never find a devotee of tennis rampaging around town.

That doesn't mean that tennis players are exempt from anxiety or stress, and more than one professional tennis player has had to deal with bullying. To a great extent, they weather such episodes cloaked in the assuredness of their skill and the confidence they exhibit while playing.

By no means are we trivialising their experience. However, their resilience in facing such torment could serve as a blueprint toward a more certain and assured outlook of your own.

Studies show that tennis players tend to be more optimistic and enjoy higher levels of self-esteem. They suffer less from anxiety and depression than those who are mostly sedentary and even those who engage in other sports. They are also less prone to anger.

Tennis is a social sport. Sure, you might practise your swing with a tennis machine but you're not really playing tennis unless at least one other person is at the other end of the court.

To play effectively, you must interact with other players. That means drawing on your people skills, particularly your ability to communicate well. Getting to know other players - why they play tennis, what got them into the game and who their tennis heroes are is an essential part of being a tennis player.

There is an element of strategy to the game, after all, and getting into your opponents' heads is a winning tactic.

Building connections and exercising conversation skills do wonders for our mental health, which makes tennis far better than most other sports for our mental well-being.

Even the basic rules of tennis etiquette emphasize social behaviour!

Many sports offer degrees of intensity.
Unlike other sports, tennis does not offer an extensive array of equipment to intensify the game. Photo by MHMD on Unsplash

Is Tennis Good Exercise?

As mentioned in this article's introduction, the past year has not been beneficial to our bodies or minds. Common sense dictates that getting moving - getting away from our current slump is one of the best ways to kickstart our revised life and live up to our new ideals.

Not every sport will embrace all of those changes. You need one that will:

  • decrease your stress levels
  • alleviate depression or eliminate the risk of becoming depressed
  • boost your mood
  • increase your mental alertness
  • improve your self-confidence
  • encourage usage of your interpersonal and communication skills
  • help you develop a positive body image

Athletes might argue that their particular sport would also render those benefits and, to an extent, they would be right. However, unlike many sports, tennis is neither combative nor particularly competitive - two elements of athletics that could increase stress and heighten the risk of injury.

Tennis is more of a test of skill and endurance. Unlike weightlifters who can add more weights and reps to their routine, you can't add more rackets or longer play to tennis to make it more complex or strenuous.

And, unlike runners who may exercise their passion across a variety of terrains, altitudes and climates, tennis-playing always takes place on a level field and in optimal weather conditions. If there are no such conditions to be had outside, people play tennis indoors.

Other sports rely on a host of variables and, sometimes, equipment to make their sport more challenging and yield superlative results. For tennis, only the player - their skill, adroitness and stamina, define how they will develop.

You can know the basic tennis lessons for beginners here.

Risking the Benefits of Tennis

All told, tennis benefits are amazing but you risk losing out on them if you're not physically ready for the challenge. One of the most obvious ways people can rob themselves of the benefits of tennis is through injury.

If you've ever watched a Grand Slam event or Wimbledon, the crown jewel of tennis Grand Slams, you've surely seen the players dash madly about, leap high into the air and thwack the ball as hard as they possibly can. The stresses their joints, connective tissues, bones and muscles endure during just one match would be devastating if those athletes were not so well-conditioned.

Even if you are in fairly good physical shape, you have to remember that repetitive motion and extreme movements can cause injuries, either immediately or over time. That's why, as you build your tennis skills, you should also step up your fitness regimen to include high-intensity and high-impact reps like skip rope, running and weightlifting.

We'll go over the ideal workout for tennis players in the next section.

Among the benefits of tennis, a seldom thought-of one is learning to listen to your body. Granted, that's a skill most athletes develop in the course of their training but tennis players become particularly adept at reading biofeedback. The first time they feel a twinge in their elbow, for example, they're likely to ice their inflamed tendon and wear a brace to provide additional support.

Again, this is a skill every athlete (everyone!) should develop. You should too so that you don't miss out on the benefits of playing tennis.

Tennis and the training you'll undergo are good exercise
Not only is tennis good exercise, the workouts you do to condition yourself for tennis are great, too. Photo by Brendan Stephens on Unsplash

The Ideal Tennis Workout

If you're new to tennis (or any intensive physical activity), the worst thing you can do is not have a workout plan. Simply doing a few stretches or maybe heading to the gym for strength training will do some good - it's better than nothing, but general workouts fail to condition the systems that tennis targets.

You need a comprehensive tennis workout plan that will increase endurance, improve flexibility, build strength and, most importantly, give your body a chance to rest and recover before you do it all again.

Bilateral strength training is paramount. You might serve with only one arm and push off laterally with one leg but you need whole-body conditioning, not just the parts that will work the hardest on the court.

Your body will absorb substantial shock as you jump while serving and while stopping abruptly to meet the ball. A regime of running is not sufficient to get your ankles, knees, hips and spine ready for repeated impacts; skipping rope or the single-leg base land on alternating legs. Single leg lateral bounces are very effective, too.

Your torso will twist a lot when playing so building up your obliques and abs is essential. Plate rotations and cable core rotations are the ideal exercises for that. Those muscle groups as well as your arms will be further worked when you do single-arm medicine ball throws, at chest level, of course. And remember to work both arms, not just your playing arm.

You can put that medicine ball to further use by holding it in both hands at shoulder height and rotating at the hip.

To build speed and precision on the court, incorporate box drills into your tennis workout. These drills are perfect to practise the sudden starts and stops you'll make when you play.

And, finally, make time for yoga.

Earlier, we said resting and recovery are integral to body conditioning, especially for a demanding sport like tennis. You may not feel like you need a day off from strenuous workouts but doing so is the best way to prevent injury that could keep you sidelined for months. Yoga is both restful and restorative, all while helping you become more flexible and toned.

Of all the benefits of playing tennis - the rush of excitement, the satisfaction of a well-landed hit and the power of your stroke, none are so rich as tennis being good exercise, both on and off the courts.

Are you ready to hit the courts now? Take our beginner's guide to tennis with you!

>

The platform that connects tutors and students

First Lesson Free

Enjoyed this article? Leave a rating.

5.00 (1 rating(s))
Loading...

Sophia

A vagabond traveler whose first love is the written word, I advocate for continuous learning, cycling, and the joy only a beloved pet can bring. There is plenty else I am passionate about, but those three should do it, for now.