"First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win." -Mahatma Ghandi

If Gandhi, the most peaceful man on the planet, dealt with bullies, we are also bound to deal with the harmful threats of others. Whether it is out of jealously, from their feelings of insignificance, or how they were raised, bullies come in many different forms, yet their primary goal is the same: to make others feel powerless.

Though it's worth stating that there are bullies in the workplace and even in the family, it seems that bullying tends to occur most commonly at school during the formative years.

So, without further delay, in today's article, we shall discuss the types of bullying, how to deal with bullying at school, a guide for parents on dealing with bullies, and defining cyberbullying. Let's get reading!

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Types of Bullying

intimidation that hurts
The most obvious form of bullying is physical intimidation, which can leave physical and emotional scars. (Source: pixabay)

Bullying has been defined as seeking to hurt, intimidate, and coerce someone weaker than you. Bullies are of all ages, and they consistently hurt other people's feelings so that they can feel better about themselves. Bullying happens around the world, and, unfortunately, we all know of a bully and may have had run-ins with one.

One of the best ways to reduce bullying is to raise awareness about the distinct types of bullying in the school environment. By having an idea of what to expect, children and teens can steer clear of bullying and avoid becoming someone who intimidates others.

The following list outlines the six most common forms of bullying:

  • Physical Bullying: the most easily recognisable form of bullying, physical intimidation involves hurting others by hitting, biting, slapping, kicking, hair pulling, etc.
  • Emotional Intimidation: also known as relational aggression, emotional bullying is extraordinarily harmful and involves manipulating the victim and excluding them from social gatherings and events purposefully.
  • Verbal Bullying is a form of intimidation involving name-calling, insults, and spreading rumours; verbal bullying is quite common among young students. Victims of verbal bullying are left feeling worthless and unlovable.
  • Sexual Bullying: another harmful type of bullying is sexual bullying, and it involves crude remarks, sexual name-calling, vulgar gestures, and uninvited touching. Sexual intimidation can lead to sexual abuse and is disgusting.
  • Cyberbullying: a newer form of intimidation, cyberbullying involves torment and harassment by a group of persons of a single individual via electronic means such as email, social media, chat rooms, and instant messaging.
  • Racist Bullying: prejudicial bullying is terrible because it concerns poking fun at others because their skin colour, religious beliefs, sexual orientation, and cultural customs are different from ours. This can cause persons from that culture to become ashamed of how they are and where they came from.

All persons, whether in school or not, should become aware of all the previously mentioned types of bullying and do all they can to prevent it from spreading.

Need some tips to deal with bullying? Check out the following subheading to learn more!

How to Deal with Bullying at School

No one likes to be bullied or wants to be intimidated verbally, physically, or racially. However, unfortunately, most of us have had to deal with unpleasant moments of bullying where we do not feel comfortable, and our self-esteem plummets.

I guess the only positive thing about bullying is that you are not alone, and the following statistics from UK schools back that point up:

  • More than 50% of people under the age of 25 have experienced some form of bullying during their formative years,
  • People with physical disabilities are much more common to become the victims of bullying than those without physical disabilities,
  • More than a third of bullying victims develop anxiety and depression, leading to suicidal thoughts.

The previously mentioned facts are concerning, and parents and teachers need to do their best to instruct their children about dealing with bullying at school. But, how? Without further ado, the below list mentions the top ten tips to stand up to bullies successfully:

  • Walk away from the bully,
  • Stay well surrounded with other friends and a support team,
  • Prepare some effective comeback lines,
  • Talk to a trusted adult such as a parent, family member, tutor, or teacher about what you are dealing with, 
  • Do your best to avoid the bully at all costs, 
  • Speak with courage and confidence when the bully approaches you, 
  • Put yourself in the shoes of the bully and attempt to sympathise with them, 
  • Throw the bully off by lighting the mood and making a joke or two and laughing, 
  • Stay positive and remember that you're not the problem; the bully is, 
  • Get as many tips and tricks from helpful outlets as possible. 

Though teens and children may indeed feel too afraid and intimidated to apply the previously mentioned tips, it's a parents responsibility to encourage them to stand up to the bully and do the best they can to ensure that verbal, physical, and emotional torment ends before severe consequences arise.

While there are many things that kids and teens can do to handle bullying successfully, there are also a few things NOT to do. Such as? Take a look at the following list:

  • Retaliate and bully someone else in return,
  • Self-harm yourself, 
  • Think that you deserve to be bullied,
  • Skip school or activities because the bully will be there.

Are you a parent, and you are struggling to help your child deal with bullies victoriously? If so, don't worry about it and read the following subheading that answers the questions you may have.

A Guide for Parents on How to Spot and Deal with Bullies

tips for adults
Parents should share the information about bullying and how to handle it with their children or teens. (Source: Unsplash)

Finding out that their child or teen is being bullied at school is extremely difficult for a parent. They feel sad, responsible, and helpless. They might even think to themselves, why would anyone hurt the person I love the most in this world?

While we aren't saying that it will happen, parents need to equip themselves with the necessary tools to deal with bullying when it comes up since more and more youths in the UK are victims of intimidation at school. Parents need to recognise and teach their children about the various types of bullies that are found. Such as? The following list draws attention to this:

  • Bully-victims, 
  • Popular bullies, 
  • Relational bullies, 
  • Serial bullies, 
  • Group bullies, 
  • Indifferent bullies. 

By knowing the tactics of the previously mentioned bullies, mothers and fathers know how to prepare their kids for what to say and do before it's too late. Also, parents feel a sense of urgency to protect their sons and daughters by having an idea of the consequences of bullying and how serious it can be.

For example, those victims of bullying may suffer a loss of appetite, trouble sleeping, depression & anxiety, low self-esteem, the fear to make new friends, lack of desire to do anything, suicidal thoughts, and self-harm.

Thankfully, parents aren't left to fend for themselves and figure out how to help their children deal with bullying since there are many guides and helpful suggestions from parents who have been through the same experience. The following are a few steps that parents should take and apply when they discover that their child or teen is the victim of intimidation:

  • Be observant to changes in the attitude of your child, 
  • Be supportive and patient when they approach you with the subject,
  • Refrain from retaliating against the bully and their parents,
  • Provide helpful advice that they can use right away, 
  • Work with others to help make your load lighter, 
  • Build up your child's self-esteem by having them participate in activities they love. 

Parents, we know that helping your child deal with bullying may be an awkward situation, but remember it's your responsibility, and you will feel closer to your kid or teen by having helped them through a significant obstacle at school.

What is Cyberbullying and How to Avoid it?

saddening words
Since perpetrators are behind a computer screen, they feel they can say anything to the victim. Verbal attacks over the internet are known as cyberbullying. (Source: pixabay)

Though the internet has provided us with so many excellent tools that make our lives easier, there are some downfalls. Such as? While we could mention a few, we're going to focus our attention on cyberbullying and the emotional and mental damage it causes to its victims.

Cyberbullying is intimidation, harsh comments, threats, and insults over the internet using any electronic means. Also known as online bullying, cyberbullying is a significant problem for kids in secondary schools across the UK.

Online intimidation is an issue that nearly 25% of school students deal with on YouTube, Instagram, and Facebook. Victims are teased about the clothes they wear, their grades at school, or the hobbies they engage in.

But, are there any ways for kids and teens to avoid cyberbullying? Absolutely. Take a look at the following list to find some helpful advice:

  • Ignore the bully at all times, 
  • Record evidence of the bullying by taking screenshots and saving messages, 
  • Complain to the support teams of the websites that you are using to see if they can remove or restrict the bullies online actions, 
  • Block the bully or quickly delete their messages so that you don't feel intimidated. 

While the previously mentioned suggestions are great for children, are there any ways parents can help their sons and daughters deal with cyberbullying? Shoot a glance at the list mentioned below to find the answer:

  • Set boundaries on the use of technology of your child, 
  • Talk about bullying openly with your son or daughter, so it's not a taboo subject, 
  • Monitor your child for behavioural changes and try to help immediately, 
  • Look up helpful advice from trusted sources. 

In conclusion, we sincerely hope that today's article was what you need to help yourself and your kids deal with bullying in the school environment.

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Brentyn

Avid movie-goer, reader, skier and language learner. Passionate about life, food and travelling.