leadership techniques

leadership studies

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what are the techniques widely used in leadership training
isaac
24 November 2011
What guidelines should a leader follow in implementing change
isaac
24 November 2011
Why might a leader be reluctant to delegate to subordinates
isaac
24 November 2011
Explain the actions that a leader can take to manage diversity in an organisation
isaac
24 November 2011
What course are you studying, because it looks to me as though they are looking for some very specific answers. In MBA courses, a lot of emphasis is placed on leadership, but they don't generally talk about leadership 'training', but rather leadership 'development'. This is an important distinction because the former suggests that anyone can learn to lead in any style, whereas the latter is based on understanding and developing your own personal style, based on your own strengths and weaknesses. So it's important to understand the different styles that exist as a first step. Second step is to garner feedback from people that know you as to what they think you are like (360 degree feedback is a common tool). You also need to gain a deeper understanding of yourself. "Know thyself" (which hung about the door at the Oracle in Delphi).
er
25 November 2011
Some things can't be delegated. You might look through the list above and decide which ones need to be 'owned' by the leader.
er
25 November 2011
When it comes to understanding how to lead change, read the work of John Kotter. He proposed 8 steps to transformation: establish a sense of urgency, form a powerful coalition, create a vision, communicate the vision, empower others, plan for and create short term wins, consolidate improvements and institutionalise new approach.
er
25 November 2011
Diversity covers a very broad spectrum: racial, gender etc. If a new leader finds a lack of diversity in an organisation, then they have a change project to manage. Look back at Kotlers 8 steps. The first would be to establish the need e.g. if we pick from one talent group, we will find ourselves uncompetitive. Imagine what would happen if a football team would only pick players with blond hair .... how well would they do...
er
25 November 2011
One of the things that I find helps is to think of 'real world' examples for each of the questions - leadership is a practical thing, after all
er
25 November 2011
There are all sorts of reasons why a leader might be reluctant to delegate to subordinates. Speaking from experience of working with a wide range of leaders and from having led a major project myself, one gathers that there are many factors governing how, when and why leaders will or will not delegate. I believe one major reason is power and control. I've seen many leaders keep hold of tasks or roles because they do not trust their subordinates. This may or may not be justified. If one is leading an organisation or project, the best thing you can do is allow people to play to their strengths, and not try and do their jobs yourself. This takes a level of trust, because you have to be willing to allow people to fail and make mistakes. When they do fail, then a leader has the task of deciding whether to retrain and support the subordinate, and give them a chance to learn from their mistake, and to succeed in the task, or whether to remove them from that role altogether. It can be a tough choice. However, too many leaders I know simply won't delegate at all because they will not take the risk of someone in their team failing or making a mistake. Most of the time the leader then ends up being overworked and burning out as a consequence. The most efficient way to run a team is to invest in training, support and encouragement of the subordinates, and being willing to 'let go' of tasks which one is not naturally wired for. I've seen one leader who did the opposite, and every time a subordinate made mistake, they were removed, until the leader was doing most of the tasks himself, and complained loudly about it. So trust is a major issue, and if a leader cannot trust, and must have an inflated level of control, then it's time he/she was the one to go, or be retrained in leadership principles.
yvmason
25 November 2011
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