how reactive are the transition metals when compared to the group 1 metals

is it a good thing using 2 named transition metals as examples

Answers
Transition metals are less reactive. Think about what happens when you drop iron or copper (transition metals) into water, as opposed to what happens when you drop potassium, a group 1 metal, into water (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jy1DC6Euqj4)
system
12 February 2013
Would you like to know why?
system
12 February 2013
As you can see, the group one metal is clearly more reactive than transition metals.
system
12 February 2013
thanks, but why is this and what are the physical differences between group 1 and transition metals?
haribobo
12 February 2013
Physically, transition metals do not "give away" their electrons as easy when a reaction is taking place, this makes them less reactive (as shown in the video above). Alkali metals (so Group 1) however do give away their electrons much more easily and so are considered to be more reactive.
sabeehah
12 February 2013
thank you so much; how do transition metals form coloured salts and how can iron salts form different colours
haribobo
12 February 2013
Hi there . Have a look - google 'reactivity series' and you should see the list there. Lithium is reactive but rubidium is even more reactive as it is further down the group. Zinc is less reactive than lithium but copper is even less reactive than zinc. But the general principle would be that group 1 are more reactive.Hope that helps - Jon
Jonathan C.
14 February 2013
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